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09 June 2004 @ 07:13 pm
Flat pannel TVs  
Stuff i should be thinking about when i finally decide to get a new tv:

Flat-Panel TVs: Time to Go Skinny?

I'd been wondering about the exact differences between the two technologies for awhile, but never cared enough to do any research. Then this article came along and explained it all, see, procrastination _does_ pay off sometimes :)



About the degradation of plasma displays over time and the ways in which LCDs surpass plasma.

" That issue hit home for Enderle when he received a 30-inch LCD TV from Gateway to evaluate. Enderle had been quite happy with his three-year-old plasma TV--until he looked at it next to the LCD model.

"That's what really showed me how badly the plasma had degraded," Enderle recalls. "The LCD looked so much better. The funny thing is, the plasma degrades slowly over time so you don't even notice it."

LCD screens are immune to screen burn in and fade, which means they offer a significantly longer useful life than their plasma counterparts. In fact, the buttons and other components on LCD TVs are likely to fail before the screen itself does. Another advantage: LCD panels consume about half the power and produce much less heat than plasma displays. That means LCD TVs don't have to incorporate noisy fans to move cool air through the unit--a real problem with many plasma displays."

About color quality and refresh rate of LCDs:

"...In addition, most LCDs used to fall behind traditional CRTs and plasma TVs in their ability to display true colors. Skins tones or subtle shades of gray might show visible artifacts, particularly when viewing from extreme angles.

Peddie says that engineers have solved both these issues, but consumers need to do their homework when buying a LCD TV. Many models currently offer response times of 25 to 30 milliseconds, but the best ones will refresh pixels as quickly as 16 milliseconds. Make sure to check the manufacturer's specs, and if possible, watch the TV in a store to see how it handles action-packed sequences."

And as usual, waiting is good:

"Of course, any large LCD TV will cost significantly more than its similarly sized CRT TV counterpart. There's good news, however: Industry experts expect the prices on 30-inch LCD TVs to drop drastically as manufacturers ramp up production of oversized LCD panels: The market for TVs will soon look very much like that for desktop monitors. Over the period of just three or four years, flat-panel LCD displays went from being the height of cool technology to an everyday commodity."


Hmmm, how big is my current tv anyways? *gets out tape measure* Looks like a 28 inch screen, although i've heard that the manufacturers sometimes (always?) base the measurement on the actual picture tube size and not visible screen, so it might "technically" be 30 or 32 inches.

I've had this tv for about three or four years i think. Maybe the droping prices of LCD tvs is a sufficient reason to not bother taking the large tv with me when i move.
 
 
Current Mood: curiouscurious
 
 
 
Kirinkirinn on June 10th, 2004 08:48 am (UTC)
Some year, decent-sized HDTV-resolution LCD TVs will not cost obscene amounts of money. And then we will get one. Yes.
Sister Atom Bomb of Courteous Debateakiko on June 10th, 2004 01:28 pm (UTC)
But when I have a job (and the other debt-payment requirements are fulfilled, etc), we'll be able to afford things that cost obscene amounts of money. Like 50" widescreen HDTVs. Maybe that's not such a good thing ...